• SoundStage! Encore - The Cowboy Junkies'
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- Anthem's STR Integrated Amplifier (May 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- Paradigm's Perforated Phase Alignment (PPA) Lenses (March 2017)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Paradigm's Persona 9H Loudspeaker (March 2017)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Contrasts: Dynaudio's Contour and Focus XD Speaker Lines (February 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - New Technologies in MartinLogan's Masterpiece Series
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Dynaudio/Volkswagen Car Audio (December 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Gryphon Philosophy and the Kodo and Mojo S Speakers (January 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- What's a Tonmeister? (November 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - AxiomAir N3 Wireless Speaker System (December 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Bang & Olufsen BeoLab 90 (November 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Gryphon Diablo 120 Integrated Amplifier (October 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Dynaudio History and Driver Technology (October 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - The Story How Gryphon Began (September 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Devialet History, ADH Technology, and Expert 1000 Pro (September 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Devialet's Phantom Loudspeakers (August 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - McIntosh Home Theater and Streaming Audio (July 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - McIntosh MC275 Stereo Amplifier (June 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - McIntosh History and Autoformer Technology (June 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - NAD Viso HP50 Headphones (May 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - GoldenEar Technology's Anechoic Chamber (May 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - PSB's M4U 4 Earphones (April 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - GoldenEar Technology's Triton Two+ and Three+ Loudspeakers (March 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- KEF's LS50 (February 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Monitor Audio's Platinum II Series (January 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- Pryma 0|1 Headphones (December 2015)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- KEF's Blade Two Loudspeaker (November 2015)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- KEF and the Uni-Q (October 2015)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Monitor Audio Acoustics & Aesthetics (August 2015)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- PSB's Imagine T3 Loudspeaker (June 2015)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Hegel's H160 Integrated Amplifier-DAC (April 2015)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- MartinLogan's Neolith Loudspeaker (February 2015)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Paradigm's Prestige Series (December 2014)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Vivid Audio's Giya Series (October 2014)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Totem Acoustic's Torrent Technology (August 2014)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Axiom Audio's M100 v4 Loudspeaker (May 2014)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Muraudio's Domain Omni Series (March 2014)

Please send all questions to feedback@soundstageaccess.com. All questions sent to this e-mail address will be replied to online. If you do not wish to share your e-mail with other readers, please do not send it. But if you have a question, chances are others are wondering the same thing. Therefore, you will be helping not only yourself, but other readers as well when your question gets answered here.

I have a pair of Sonus Faber Concerto Grand Piano speakers, so they're a bit aged. I was thinking of getting or doing a crossover refurb. Nothing drastic, just component upgrades. Or should I use the same parts? How hard would it be to do it myself?

Thanks,

Harry Nelson

Unless there's actually something wrong with the crossover, I caution against changing it at all. If you do, your "upgrade" could actually degrade the speaker. The reason I'm against it is because I know that when good companies design and manufacture speakers, each part is carefully chosen and every unit is tested after assembly to make sure it performs like they want it to. Changing any part could drastically change the performance of the speaker, and with no follow-up testing, you'll never know that what you did actually made it any better. As I said, unless there's something wrong, I wouldn't change anything. If there is something wrong, contact Sonus Faber to make sure it gets repaired correctly.

I am reading where some companies are recommending more than one sub. Why? Is it to play the bass louder?

Ross

Two (or more) subs will play louder than one, but the main reason multiple subs are getting recommended is to achieve smoother bass response in the room. Although bass frequencies are omnidirectional and, in theory, one sub seems like it should be enough, in practice two or more subs placed strategically in a room work better.

Nice review on the JL Audio sub. The problem is that I can't afford it. What subs do you recommend for under $1000?

Richard Flemmings

The f110 is the cheapest sub JL Audio makes. But prior to reviewing the JL Audio Fathom f110, we reviewed the Elemental Designs A5-350 that sells for $800. Four other brands I'd definitely check out before you make a final decision are Paradigm, Axiom, Aperion Audio and Velodyne. The all have models that fit your budget.

Editor,

I am buying a new pair of speakers. Should I buy speakers with a soft-dome tweeter, or ones where the tweeter is made out of a hard dome such as aluminum?

Rick Robinson

Some generalizations about tweeters can be made. For example, metal-dome tweeters such as aluminum tend to have higher-frequency break-up modes than, say, silk-dome tweeters that will start deforming at a lower frequency. However, when the aluminum dome breaks up, it does so much more severely and this usually shows up as a spike in a frequency-response chart, often within the audible range. Silk-dome tweeters break up more gently, and some feel that makes them more pleasing to the ear even when it's still in the audio band. Another generalization that's made today is that the best tweeters use beryllium and diamond for their domes. Their break-up modes are super-high.

The truth of the matter is that while there is some truth to that stuff, a lot comes down to the implementation of the technology and, overall, how the speaker has been designed. Editor-in-chief Jeff Fritz recently told us that he compared two speakers, one with a beryllium-dome tweeter and another with a dome made from silk. They're both outstanding speakers, he said, with high-frequency performance that's roughly the same. Moral of the story: put most of the weight on what you hear, not what the dome is made from.  

To Colin Smith,

While reading through your decision process on your speaker choice ("On Reference Equipment"), I really appreciated the way you valued the different key features. I probably would have chosen Focus FC 9 based on your sound criteria, but I like that you used the Paradigm Signature S8 v.3 as your top pick and compared everything back to that. I went through a similar process choosing my Epos ES30 speakers, but I bought them first and then I bought the reference electronics years after. The better the electronics and room positioning the better my speakers sound. If I had changed the speakers before the amps, preamp, cable, etc., I would never have realized the Epos speakers’ full potential. Many times I felt my speakers were the limiting feature on my quest for absolute sound quality, but I have learned that my room and the rest of the chain are more critical. I have concluded the biggest speaker development that I could justify a change for is the beryllium tweeter technology that has gathered positive reviews from all publications.

My next reference speakers will have this Be tech for sure.

Thanks,

John Andersen

Thanks for your kind comments John. The "On Reference Equipment" column seems to have resonated with a lot of people. Looking back on it, I suppose I was telling a story that's familiar to anyone who's put effort into building up a great sound system. I can't agree with you more on beryllium tweeters -- they are the bomb, especially Paradigm's. . . . Colin Smith

Congratulations on the new site. It looks great. I read something about covering home-theater equipment. There's a subwoofer review, but when will the other stuff start and where will it be?

Denis Boudreau

You won't see a formal home-theater section created. Instead, reviews of home-theater products will become commonplace in the "Equipment Reviews" section, and there will be articles on various topics that will appear in the "Feature Articles" section.

My receiver has a button called Tone Defeat. What does it do?

Richard

If the receiver has a Tone Defeat button, then it also has tone controls, which allow for frequency-response adjustments for the bass and highs. The problem with tone controls is that the circuitry can add distortion to the sound, even if the buttons are left in the neutral position. It’s a small thing, but it’s been apparent to me on the receivers I’ve used. The Tone Defeat button bypasses tone-control circuitry, meaning that you can no longer adjust the bass and highs, but you’ll have purer sound. Therefore, my suggestion is to use the Tone Defeat button if you’re not going to adjust the tone controls, but live with the subtle degradation in sound that the controls bring if you do.

I hope you can help. My Yamaha receiver is about ten years old. It worked fine until yesterday when it immediately shut off for no reason. I turned it back on and it clicks off again. I tried this more than five times. Any advice?

Bruce Jarrett

Your Yamaha might be at the end of its life and is certainly well past its warranty period. My suggestion is to not turn it on anymore. There is obviously something wrong with the unit and you should get it checked by a qualified technician if you wish to continue using it. Alternatively, it might be time to start shopping for a new receiver.

Thanks, that was a very good piece ("On Reference Equipment"). I am a bit of a novice and never quite understood what "reference" meant. Now I know, and I'll always remember your personal story. And now I have my own.

Regards,

DeWitt Brock